Wednesday, December 7, 2016

( The 75th Pearl Harbor 75th Anniversary On Dec 7,1941 ) Patcnews Dec 7, 2016 The Patriot Conservative News Tea Party Network Reports The 75th Pearl Harbor 75th Anniversary On Dec 7, 1941 LT Jim Downing And Admiral Harry Harris Marking the 75th Anniversary of the Attacks on Pearl Harbor and Oahu © All Copyrights reserved By Patcnews





































 



At 7:53 A.M, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii was attacked by the Imperial Japanese Navy. The first surprise attack wave targeted airfields and battleships. The second assault targeted other vessels and shipyard facilities. Many United States service men and women were injured or lost their lives on December 7, 1941. This Photo-Art by Gilbert Padilla, Vietnam Veteran honors the sacrifices of all those who served that fateful day, a date that will live in infamy.   December 7, 1941 Attack On Pearl Harbor 
   December 7, 1941 Attack On Pearl Harbor 
 Patcnews: Live on the Air Topic is
  The 71th Anniversary of The December 7 1941 Pearl Harbor Attack and my Guest Ron Harwell

Attack On Pearl Harbor
Attack On Pearl Harbor
December 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor veterans Survivors 
 
WWII Congressional Medal Honor Pearl Harbor Veterans Survivors
 

 
Honor Our WWII Pearl Harbor Veterans
 
 
 December 7, 1941 Attack On Pearl Harbor

Attack On Pearl Harbor





***** GOD BLESS YOU AND YOUR FAMILY *****
Ahéhee Sir. ( Navajo word for today is Thank You Sir)

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE SIR!
REST IN ETERNAL PEACE!

**Chester Nez, last of original group of Navajo Code Talkers, dies at 93***
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — The language he once was punished for speaking in school became Chester Nez's primary weapon in World War II.
Before hundreds of men from the Navajo Nation became Code Talkers, Nez and 28 others were recruited to develop a code based on the then-unwritten Navajo language. Locked in a room for 13 weeks, they came up with an initial glossary of more than 200 terms using Navajo words for red soil, war chief, braided hair and hummingbird, for example, and an alphabet.
Nez never tired of telling the story to highlight his pride in having served his country and stress the importance of preserving the Navajo language. The 93-year-old died Wednesday morning of kidney failure with plenty of appearances still scheduled, said Judith Avila, who helped Nez publish his memoirs. He was the last of the original group of 29 Navajo Code Talkers.
"It's one of the greatest parts of history that we used our own native language during World War II," Nez told The Associated Press in 2009. "We're very proud of it."
Navajo President Ben Shelly ordered flags lowered across the reservation in honor of Nez from sunrise Thursday to sunset Sunday.
Nez was in 10th grade when he lied about his age to enlist in the U.S. Marine Corps not knowing he would become part of an elite group of Code Talkers. He wondered whether the code would work since the Japanese were skilled code breakers.
Few non-Navajos spoke the Navajo language, and even those who did couldn't decipher the code. It proved impenetrable. The Navajos trained in radio communications were walking copies of it. Each message read aloud by a Code Talker immediately was destroyed.
"The Japanese did everything in their power to break the code but they never did," Nez said in the AP interview.
Nez grew up speaking only Navajo in Two Wells, New Mexico, on the eastern side of the Navajo Nation. He gained English as a second language while attending boarding school, where he had his mouth washed out with soap for speaking Navajo.
When a Marine recruiter came looking for young Navajos who were fluent in Navajo and English to serve in World War II, Nez said he told his roommate "let's try it out." The dress uniforms caught his attention, too.
"They were so pretty," Nez said.
About 250 Navajos showed up at Fort Defiance, then a U.S. Army base. But only 29 were selected to join the first all-Native American unit of Marines. They were inducted in May 1942 and became the 382nd Platoon tasked with developing the code. At the time, Navajos weren't even allowed to vote.
After World War II, Nez volunteered to serve two more years during the Korean War. He retired in 1974 after a 25-year career as a painter at the Veterans Affairs hospital in Albuquerque. His artwork featuring 12 Navajo holy people was on display at the hospital.
For years, Nez's family and friends knew only that he fought the Japanese during World War II.
Nez was eager to tell his family more about his role as a Code Talker, Avila said, but he couldn't. Their mission wasn't declassified until 1968.
The accolades came much later. The original group received Congressional Gold Medals in 2001 and Nez often joked about pawning his. He measured the accuracy of the movie "Windtalkers," based on the Code Talkers that came out the following year, at 78 percent and said the Navajo spoken by Adam Beach was hard to understand but "he tried his best."
Code Talkers have appeared on television and at parades and they are routinely asked to speak to veterans groups and students. They are celebrated on the Navajo Nation with a tribal holiday.
Nez threw the opening pitch at a 2004 Major League Baseball game and offered a blessing for the presidential campaign of John Kerry. In 2012, he received a bachelor's degree from the University of Kansas, where he abandoned his studies in fine arts decades ago after tuition assistance he received for his military service ran out.
U.S. Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich, and Rep. Ben Ray Lujan, of New Mexico, praised Nez for his bravery and service to the United States in a statement Wednesday. The Code Talkers took part in every assault the Marines conducted in the Pacific, sending thousands of messages without error on Japanese troop movements and battlefield tactics.
Once while running a message, Nez and his partner were mistaken for Japanese soldiers and were threatened at gunpoint until a Marine lieutenant cleared up the confusion. He was forbidden from saying he was a Code Talker.
"He loved his culture and his country, and when called, he fought to protect both," Udall said. "And because of his service, we enjoy freedoms that have stood the test of time."
Despite having both legs partially amputated, confining him to a wheelchair, Avila said the humble Nez loved to travel and tell his story.
"It really was a good thing, such a good experience for him," she said. "He said he would do it over again if his country needed him."
A public viewing is scheduled Monday evening in Albuquerque. A mass is scheduled Tuesday in Albuquerque, with burial to follow at the Santa Fe National Cemetery in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
***** GOD BLESS YOU AND YOUR FAMILY *****
Ahéhee Sir. ( Navajo word for today is Thank You Sir)



The 75th Pearl Harbor 75th Anniversary On Dec 7, 1941












 Patton Speech -
Now, I want you to remember that no bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country.

Men, all this stuff you've heard about America not wanting to fight, wanting to stay out of the war, is a lot of horse dung. Americans, traditionally, love to fight. All real Americans love the sting of battle.

When you were kids, you all admired the champion marble shooter, the fastest runner, the big league ball players, the toughest boxers. Americans love a winner and will not tolerate a loser. Americans play to win all the time.

Now, I wouldn't give a hoot in hell for a man who lost and laughed. That's why Americans have never lost and will never lose a war. Because the very thought of losing is hateful to Americans.

Now, an army is a team. It lives, eats, sleeps, fights as a team. This individuality stuff is a bunch of crap. The bilious bastards who wrote that stuff about individuality for the Saturday Evening Post don't know anything more about real battle than they do about fornicating.

Now, we have the finest food and equipment, the best spirit, and the best men in the world. You know, by God, I actually pity those poor bastards we're going up against. By God, I do. We're not just going to shoot the bastards. We're going to cut out their living guts and use them to grease the treads of our tanks. We're going to murder those lousy Hun bastards by the bushel.

Now, some of you boys, I know, are wondering whether or not you'll chicken-out under fire. Don't worry about it. I can assure you that you will all do your duty. The Nazis are the enemy. Wade into them. Spill their blood. Shoot them in the belly. When you put your hand into a bunch of goo that a moment before was your best friend's face, you'll know what to do.

Now there's another thing I want you to remember. I don't want to get any messages saying that we are holding our position. We're not holding anything. Let the Hun do that. We are advancing constantly and we're not interested in holding onto anything -- except the enemy. We're going to hold onto him by the nose, and we're gonna kick him in the ass. We're gonna kick the hell out of him all the time, and we're gonna go through him like crap through a goose!

Now, there's one thing that you men will be able to say when you get back home, and you may thank God for it. Thirty years from now when you're sitting around your fireside with your grandson on your knee, and he asks you, "What did you do in the great World War II?" -- you won't have to say, "Well, I shoveled shit in Louisiana."















Patton’s Prayer for Fair Weather and the Turn of World War II















In early December 1944, Gen. George Patton’s Third Army was poised for the breakthrough across the Rhine River, a formidable natural obstacle to the invasion of Germany by the western allies. The date for the attack was set for Dec. 19 but foul weather threatened to postpone the attack.

At 11 a.m. on the morning of Dec. 8, Patton phoned the Head Chaplain of the Third Army, James H. O’Neill, a Catholic priest.

“This is General Patton; do you have a good prayer for weather? We must do something about those rains if we are to win the war.”

The taciturn O’Neill told Patton that he would research the topic and report back to him within an hour. After hanging up the receiver, O’Neill looked out at the immoderate rains, which had plagued the Third Army’s operations for the past three months. As he searched through his prayer books, he could find no formal prayers pertaining to weather so he composed an original prayer, which he typed on a note card:

Almighty and most merciful Father, we humbly beseech Thee, of Thy great goodness, to restrain these immoderate rains with which we have had to contend. Grant us fair weather for Battle. Graciously hearken to us as soldiers who call upon Thee that, armed with Thy power, we may advance from victory to victory, and crush the oppression and wickedness of our enemies and establish Thy justice among men and nations.

O’Neill threw on his trench coat and crossed the quadrangle of the old French military barracks then serving as the Third Army’s headquarters and reported to Patton’s office. Patton read the prayer, returned it to O’Neill and directed him to “have 250,000 copies printed and see to it that every man in the Third Army gets one.”















Copy of the letter and Prayer for Fair Weather sent by Gen. Patton to soldiers of the Third Army in Christmas 1944. Photo Credit: history.com 

The often profane and tempestuous general and the humble, mild-mannered priest then engaged in a lengthy discussion of the importance of prayer.

“Chaplain, how much praying is being done in the Third Army?” inquired the general.

“Does the general mean by chaplains, or by the men?” asked O’Neill.

“By everybody,” Patton replied.

“I am afraid to admit it, but I do not believe that much praying is going on,” responded O’Neill. “When there is fighting, everyone prays, but now with this constant rain – when things are quiet, dangerously quiet, men just sit and wait for things to happen. Prayer out here is difficult. Both chaplains and men are removed from a special building with a steeple. Prayer to most of them is a formal, ritualized affair, involving special posture and a liturgical setting. I do not believe that much praying is being done.”

“Chaplain, I am a strong believer in Prayer,” said Patton. “There are three ways that men get what they want; by planning, by working, and by Praying. Any great military operation takes careful planning, or thinking. Then you must have well-trained troops to carry it out: that’s working. But between the plan and the operation there is always an unknown. That unknown spells defeat or victory, success or failure. It is the reaction of the actors to the ordeal when it actually comes. Some people call that getting the breaks; I call it God. God has His part, or margin in everything. That’s where prayer comes in.”















Gen. George Patton. Photo Credit: generalpatton.com 

Patton said that men should pray no matter where they were, in church or out of it, that if they did not pray, sooner or later they would “crack up.”

“We must ask God to stop these rains. These rains are that margin that hold defeat or victory. If we all pray…it will be like plugging in on a current whose source is in Heaven. I believe that prayer completes that circuit. It is power,” said Patton.

The Prayer Card, with a Christmas Greeting printed on the reverse side, reached the troops between Dec. 12 and 14.

Two days later the Americans armies in Europe would find themselves engaged in the Battle of the Bulge, which remains the greatest battle ever fought by American forces. The outcome of that battle, and possibly of the entire Allied war effort in Europe, would hinge on the weather. As Patton’s adjutant, Paul Harkins would later write:

Whether it was the help of the Divine guidance asked for in the prayer or just the normal course of human events, we never knew; at any rate, on the twenty-third, the day after the prayer was issued, the weather cleared and remained perfect for about six days. Enough to allow the Allies to break the backbone of the Von Runstedt offensive and turn a temporary setback into a crushing defeat for the enemy.

On Christmas Eve when Chaplain O’Neill walked into Patton’s office the general rose, came from behind his desk with hand outstretched, and said, “Chaplain, you’re the most popular man in this Headquarters. You sure stand in good with the Lord and the soldiers.”
The general then pinned a Bronze Star Medal on Chaplain O’Neill.



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